Home

Biographical

Interview

Reviews

Galleries

Reminiscences

Miscellany

Audio/Video

Discography

Links

REVIEWS (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)

VicResp1a
VicTen2a
VicTen3a
VicTen4

Gramophone 1960

Jul711a
July713
Couperin1a
Couperin2

Gramophone 1969

HandelOrgCons1a1

Gramophone 1971

Oct79a
Oct79b

Gramophone 1983

Aug74a1
Jan83a1a

Gramophone 1979

Dec51

Gramophone 1974

Feb811a

Gramophone 1983

a

Gramophone 1951

XmasCarolsA
XmasCarolsB

Gramophone 1981

Though an occasional piece written to mark the 500th anniversary of the University of Basle and setting words from the University's Charter as well as from songs in praise of the City of Basle, Britten's Cantata Academica Op.62 of 1959 is a delightful, un-academic romp (it even includes a Tema seriale con Fuga). Britten in his most unbridled outdoor mood, gently parodying classical forms such as recitative, fugue and the like. Curiously this colourful, umproblematic piece has only been recorded once: originally as L'OISEAU-LYRE OSL 50206, later re-issued with Cantata Misericordium Op.69 and (I think) A Boy Was Born, and finally in CD format as DECCA 425153-2LM. The present performers have all had long association with Britten's music and George Malcolm conducts an affectionate, zestful reading of this unjustly neglected piece.
Hubert Culot

Gramophone 2002

The Missa Brevis was written for this very choir and George Malcolm’s nurturing of a tonal brightness in the choir allowed Britten to use the voices in a more flexible and instrumental manner than usual. The effect is glorious. St Columba founded the monastery on the Scottish island of Iona and Britten’s hymn sets his simple and forthright prayer with deceptive simplicity and directness. The choir sings beautifully and the recording is first-rate. Gramophone Choice

Gramophone 1977

George Malcolm’s harpsichord performances of the Fantasia in d and the great In Nomine (John Bull) are among the great recorded keyboard performances of the twentieth century.
Paul Shoemaker

Jacob: Sextet for wind quintet and piano, Op.3

Gareth Morris (flute), Leonard Brain (oboe), Stephen Waters (clarinet), Dennis Brain (horn), Cecil James (bassoon) & George Malcolm (piano)

Gordon Jacob’s five-movement Sextet – now with George Malcolm as pianist – is a delight in its clarity, touching expression and rhythmic sleights. As Tully Potter annotates in his booklet note, it’s a “French-sounding” work, and intensified as such through the use of Gareth Morris’s wooden flute and Cecil James’s French bassoon. Jacob’s Sextet is an enjoyable listen. Should you not know, or be curious: oboist Leonard Brain was Dennis’s brother and, here, is an eloquent contributor to the opening of the third movement ‘Cortège’, the emotional core of Jacob’s Sextet, which was recorded less than six weeks before Dennis Brain was killed – in the early hours of 1 September 1957, he was driving back from the Edinburgh Festival; as he neared London his car crashed, presumably as a result of him falling asleep at the wheel. Classicalsource.com

GMMmag
Top of page